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  1. Psalms in Hebrew is tehellim – meaning “praises.”
  2. Psalms in Greek is psalmos, referring to “songs accompanied by stringed instruments.” (notice the format of the printed words; the Psalms are lyrics to songs.)
  3. A particular tune for the words is often provided. What is the tune given to the leader in one of the following Psalms?
    Psalm 7 Shiggaion of David
    Psalm 8 according to The Gittith
    Psalm 22 according to The Deer of the Dawn
    Psalm 75 Do Not Destroy. A Psalm of Asaph.
  4. The 150 Psalms have been collected into five sections or books.
  5. Each section or book ends with a doxology.  See for example, Ps. 41:13, Ps. 72:19, Ps. 89:52, Ps. 106:48, or Ps. 150:6.
  6. Many of the Psalms are linked to a particular event. Discover the event in one of the following psalms:
    Psalm 3 A Psalm David, when he fled from his son Absalom.
    Psalm 18 A Psalm of David on the day when the Lord delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.
    Psalm 54 A Maskil of David, when the Ziphites went and told Saul, “David is in hiding among us.”
    Psalm 56 A Maskil of David: Complaint about a Friend’s Treachery
  7. How many of the Psalms are acrostics? 9
  8. The Psalmists address God in various ways. Many of the Psalms use the title, “Lord.” Discover one or more additional names for God in the following Psalms:
    Psalm 4 God of my right
    Psalm 8 Lord, our Sovereign
    Psalm 9 O Most High
    Psalm 20 God of Jacob
    Psalm 47 the Lord, the Most High; our King
    Psalm 80 O Shepherd of Israel; Lord God of hosts
    Psalm 84 Lord of hosts; Lord God of hosts
  9. The longest Psalm is 119 and the shortest is 117 with only two verses.
  10. The most common poetic device used in the Psalms is
    d. Parallelism
  11. What do scholars think is the meaning of the term “Selah”?
    1. An interlude during which something else was to be sung or played
    2. “to lift up” (from the Hebrew root s-l-l) , suggesting lifting up one’s voice to sing louder or lifting up the sound of the music to play or sing louder
    3. “to turn, to bend, or to pray” (from the Aramaic root (s-l-h), a cue for worshipers to kneel, bow, or fall prostrate in humble submission to God
    4. All of the above

Source: Faith Questions: Psalms, Lien, Boyd; Passion, Promise & Praise. Griggs, Donald

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